Ledger Lines:Green

18"x18"x 2 1/2 "

encaustic on panel

In Ledger Lines: Red and Green, I marry two uses of the word “ledger”, a musical idea and also a play on ancient written language.”  We know that musicians notate tones that are higher or lower than the regular staff by drawing extra ledger lines.

The ancient written language called Linear B, first discovered on the island of Crete, inspires the calligraphy in these art pieces.  Some of the fragments found were ledgers used in commerce.

Ledger Lines:Red

18"x18"x 2 1/2"

encaustic on panel


Evening Song #4 

Encaustic on panel

12 inches x 12 inches ​sold

Counterpoint #2 

Encaustic on panel

12 inches x 12 inches

Plainsong #6     Encaustic on panel​

​12 inches x 12 inches

Plainsong # 5    Encaustic on panel

​12 inches x 12 inches

Evening Song # 2 

Encaustic on panel

18 inches x 18 inches sold

Rhapsody

18"x18"x 2 1/2" 

Encaustic on panel 

Arabesque #2  Encaustic on panel

12 inches x 12 inches ​sold



Evening Song   Encaustic on panel

12 inches x 12 inches


Counterpoint # 3

Encaustic on panel

​12 inches x 12 inches​ 

Autumn Grace

18"x18"x 2 1/2"

encaustic on panel

In Autumn Grace and Rhapsody, the arabesque gestures remind me of a conductor’s hands in the motion of directing an orchestra.
Music inspires all of my art: I honor a Master Designer.



Res​et Your Password  One 

Encaustic on panel

12 inches x 12 inches

Bar Code    Encaustic on panel

24 inches x 24 inches​ sold

Reset Your Password Two

Encaustic on panel

​12 inches x 12 inches

Arabesque #3   Encaustic on panel

12 inches x 12 inches ​sold


 I’ve traveled to Ephesus, Athens, and Pompeii, and have visited some of the great museums of the world.  The most memorable cuneiform tablets I encountered were at Berlin’s Pergamon Museum.  These clay tablets stood almost as tall as I am, and impressed me so deeply that they have taken hold of my artwork.
Thinking about the origins of language and music inspire me to create art. I imagine early man’s symbols copied from his natural environment. And I sense the rhythm and flow of the words, as they become his first chants.
Not all cuneiform tablets contain mysterious messages; many are simply ledgers recording business transactions: delivery of staples such as wheat, wine and cattle.  Mindful of this, and also that I sometimes take myself too seriously, I name this painting Bar Code.

Reset Your Password, an encaustic diptych on panel, is my improvisation in response to an ancient language system called Linear B.  I began this diptych while reading The Riddle of the Labyrinth, the Quest to Crack an Ancient Code, by the linguist/journalist, Margalit Fox. Ms. Fox tells the compelling story of how the Victorian archeologist, Arthur Evans, discovered clay tablets on the isle of Crete, how Alice Kober, an American scholar  during the 1940’s, systematically worked at deciphering their language, and how a young English architect, Michael Ventris, finally cracked their ancient code in 1952.

The Linear B tablets date from about 1450 B.C. and are filled with beautiful, mysterious pictographs.  My calligraphy for Reset Your Password, purposely soft-edged and out of focus, is an improvisation on, rather than a literal copy of the Linear B pictographs.  While creating the diptych, I realized that my response suggests the strange calligraphy we may see,  prompted by our computers. 




 

​Pat Lagger

Counterpoint     Encaustic on panel

12 inches x 12 inches